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Monitoring your treadwear is an important part of maintaining the integrity of your car’s tires. There are a few simple ways for you to check your tire tread depth. It’s easier than you think! Click here to see how simple it is to monitor your treadwear!

There are a few simple ways for you to check your tire tread depth. It’s easier than you think! Click here to see how simple it is to monitor your treadwear! Tire tread depth is a way to determine how soon you will need to buy new tires. It is a good idea to keep an eye on the depth of your tire tread because heavily worn tread – deemed 2/32” by legal definition – may lead to unsafe driving conditions. Luckily, there is more than one approach to check your tire tread depth. These tips will show you how simple it is to keep tabs on the depth of your tread and know when it’s time to grab a new set of tires. Call us when you’re ready for new tires. We’re glad to help!

Penny Test

Chances are you have a penny in your front pocket or in the ashtray of your car. Maybe you even have a designated coin compartment in your vehicle! You can use a penny to determine treadwear by inserting the penny between the tread ribs of your tire with Lincoln’s head pointing down. If the top of his head disappears between the ribs, your tread is still more than 2/32”. Can you see his entire head? It’s time for new tires. Follow these additional tips when trying the penny test:

• Check each tire in multiple locations, paying close attention to areas with additional wear – this will also help you determine if your tires are wearing evenly

• If some of Lincoln’s head is visible (but not all) it is recommended to keep monitoring your treadwear because your tires may be getting close to needing replacement

Indicator Bars

The US Department of Transportation requires that all tires come equipped with treadwear indicator bars located between the tread ribs at the 2/32” mark. This enables drivers to easily monitor treadwear over time. As the tire wears, the indicator bars appear closer to the tire’s surface. When the tires become “bare,” the tread will be flush with the indicator bars and it will be time for a new set of tires.

Tread Depth Gauge

Another well-established and accurate method of measuring treadwear depth is to use a tread depth gauge. You can purchase one of these online or at most auto parts retailers. Tread depth gauges are easy to use and read in 32nds of an inch, making it a piece of cake at determining wear. Although the legal limit for acceptable treadwear is 2/32”, tire performance begins to diminish much sooner. If you’re still unsure of your tires’ tread depth and whether your tires need to be replaced, contact a tire professional so we can help.

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